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Seven Days
Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice, Seven Days
Independent Vermont alt-weekly covering news, politics, food, arts, music and culture.

Seven Days | Vermont's Independent Voice, Seven Days
  • Farmers Market Kitchen: Pesto Potato-Leek Pizza
    In my house, pizza happens at least once a week, sometimes more. Lately, I've been into making sourdough bread (it's quite the rabbit hole, as any home baker can attest), and I make enough bread dough for a big loaf of bread plus two or three pizza crusts. If I'm out of the baking habit, I just buy raw pizza dough — Hannaford carries a decent option from Maine's Portland Pie Co., Red Hen Baking offers par-baked crusts at several retail outlets statewide, and there are others, too. Check the fresh pasta section or the freezer section.

    And, yes, I use a cookie sheet as a pizza pan because I've not gotten around to buying a pizza stone or a proper round pan. It's still delicious,  thank you very much.

    Then, I just throw on whatever's in the fridge, or coming from the market or garden. In spring and early summer, we ate a lot of red-sauce pies with last summer's canned tomatoes, broccoli rabe, pea shoots, chives and other early season stuff.

    Now, it's evolved into a pesto base with high-summer items such as garden tomatoes, summer squash (from my neighbors at Stone River Homestead), homemade pesto and new potatoes and leeks (found last week at Thetford's Cedar Circle Farm).

    I usually use basic Cabot cheddar or mozzarella, but if I had the foresight to pick it up at the co-op, I'd grab a pint of Maplebrook Farm's fresh balled mozzarella and pop those on top. You could also use dollops of ricotta or chèvre to similar effect.

    Think of it this way: The world is your pizza!

    Ingredients
    • One pizza dough (find them near the fresh pasta at the grocery store, or make your own!)
    • 3-4 medium potatoes, sliced thin and boiled until soft
    • Pat butter
    • 1 small leek, sliced thin
    • One cup pesto* (recipe below)
    • Half of a medium-sized zucchini, sliced thin
    • 1 clove garlic, minced
    • 1 cup grated mozzarella*, cheddar or Jack cheese
    • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan
    • *Swap balled fresh mozzarella if you've got it. Quarter-size balls or smaller can go on whole; a fist-size ball must be cut into 1/2 inch slices.
    Preparation
    1. In the morning, prepare your dough, if you're making it yourself. If you're using a store-bought raw dough, set…

    2. Obituary: Rev. Mark W. Bolles, 1951-2018
      Machias, Maine As anyone who had ever sat in a pew during one of his sermons, read his “Observer” columns in the Charlotte News, swapped songs with him around a campfire or taken a long drive to points unknown with him would tell you, Mark Bolles was a born storyteller. And because his life’s philosophy was to “Say yes and work out the details later,” many of his best stories were his own. Mark lived a full and fascinating life. He was born to Henry and Doreen Bolles on August 21, 1951, in Providence, R.I., and his early years revolved around the Beneficent Congregational Church. Mark moved his young family to Bangor, Maine, in 1983 to study theology at Bangor Theological Seminary. In 1985, he was assigned to the Machiasport Congregational Church in Machiasport, Maine, as a student pastor, which began his lifelong love for Down East Maine. During this time, he also served the Marshfield Congregational Church in Marshfield, Maine, and earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Maine at Machias. In 1989, he accepted a call to the Charlotte Congregational Church, where he served for a decade. He immersed himself in the Charlotte community, not only through his ministry, but as a school bus driver for the Charlotte Central School and as a columnist for the Charlotte News. Faith and community would provide Mark a road map for life, particularly in his career as a minister. But he relished detours, too. He left the church in 1999 and began a second career as an owner/operator of a tour bus company, Bristol Tours. While he loved his time in Vermont, Mark’s heart never really left Maine. Nor did his soul ever really leave the pulpit. He returned to both in 2015, accepting a call to the Whitneyville Congregational Church in Whitneyville, Maine, and moving to Machias with his wife, Susan. Regardless of where he was, Mark was a devoted father, grandfather and husband. He was an asset to any community in which he found himself. While he sometimes took an unconventional approach to ministry, he was a brilliant and progressive preacher whose eloquent, clever sermons taught love, understanding and compassion — words he lived by to his dying day through actions large and small, whether comforting parishioners, offering an easy smile to his passengers, picking up hitchhikers or helping to rebuild Southern churches devastated by…

    3. Flights and Sights: Don't Miss These Airport Art Exhibitions

      Burlington City Arts curates exhibits in three areas of the airport: the Skyway, the area above the escalator and the walls facing security for Gates 1 through 8. Whether you've arrived early for a flight or are waiting to pick up passengers, do take the time to look around!

      → Version française Burlington City Arts curates exhibits in three areas of the airport: the Skyway, the area above the escalator and the walls facing security for Gates 1 through 8. Whether you've arrived early for a flight or are waiting to pick up passengers, do take the time to look around! In September, photographer Elliot Burg presents "Athletes for the Ages" in the Skyway, with images celebrating the senior athletes who competed in 2015's National Senior Games. In the Gates, Joy Huckins-Noss exhibits contemporary pointillism focusing on the natural world. Says the artist, "I want to bring the feelings and sensations of being outdoors into the painting." In October and November, the Skyway features photography by Caleb Foster. With his dynamic images of Vermont and beyond, the artist hopes to capture details of the "beauty and awesome scale of our created world," he writes. In the Gates, Tom Cullins' paintings explore light, color, and cubistic and abstract compositions. All three months, Lee Garrison's (1928-2014) diptych "Giant Red Hibiscus" is mounted by the escalator. The artist spent more than 30 of her summers painting on the shores of Lake Champlain. If you're going up, be sure to turn around and look at the wall behind you. But watch your step! All of these artists have lived or spent time in Vermont. Please enjoy examples of their work at the airport and on their individual websites. Find more information about Burlington City Arts and its downtown gallery and programs at burlingtoncityarts.org. Burlington City Arts organise des expositions à trois endroits dans l'aéroport : dans le Skyway, au-dessus de l'escalier mécanique et sur les murs qui font face à la sécurité pour les portes 1 à 8. Que vous soyez arrivé à l'avance pour votre vol ou que vous attendiez des passagers, prenez le temps de regarder autour de vous! En septembre, le photographe Elliot Burg présente l'exposition « Athletes for the Ages » dans le Skyway. Ses photos rendent hommage aux sportifs qui ont participé aux jeux nationaux pour personnes âgées en 2015. Dans le secteur des portes, Joy Huckins-Noss expose des toiles pointillistes modernes sur le thème du monde naturel. Elle affirme : « J'essaie d'intégrer dans la peinture les sentiments et les sensations ressentis en plein air ». En octobre et en novembre, vous pourrez admirer dans le Skyway les photographies de Caleb Foster. Avec ses images dynamiques du…

    4. Shacksbury Cidermakers Celebrate Traditional and Wild Apples

      Anyone taking a leisurely back-road drive to enjoy Vermont's foliage is sure to spy some old apple trees: gnarled and stooped, tangled in the hedgerows or standing near an old farmhouse. Many of these forgotten trees still bear fruit, but few people pause to investigate their scabbed and misshapen apples in shades of gold and green, or red with chestnut streaks.

      → Version française Anyone taking a leisurely back-road drive to enjoy Vermont's foliage is sure to spy some old apple trees: gnarled and stooped, tangled in the hedgerows or standing near an old farmhouse. Many of these forgotten trees still bear fruit, but few people pause to investigate their scabbed and misshapen apples in shades of gold and green, or red with chestnut streaks. Not so with Colin Davis and David Dolginow. Every fall since cofounding their hard cider company, Shacksbury, in 2013, they and their colleagues have foraged promising specimens from Vermont's wild apple harvest to evaluate for use in their line of award-winning ciders. Five years in, Shacksbury's Lost Apple Project has landed them bushels of accolades and attention from the likes of the Good Food Awards, Wine Enthusiast, the Washington Post and industry influencers such as chef David Chang's Momofuku restaurant group. Shacksbury recently opened a 14,000-square-foot production headquarters and public tasting room in Vergennes, about 24 miles south of Burlington. This fall, it's launching a tasting room and second production facility on Burlington's Pine Street. Visitors might catch a glimpse of a tank labeled "Momofuku" as they sip a flight of ciders ranging from crisp and dry to delicately fruity. This is the second year the cidermakers have partnered on a co-branded custom blend created exclusively for Momofuku's New York City venues. The commitment from such a high-profile collaborator is a sign that Americans are finally giving traditional hard cider its due, Davis believes. "A restaurant putting that kind of energy into cider is significant," he says. "It shows that people are taking it seriously." Dubbed "Vermont cider revivalists" by Food & Wine, Shacksbury is part of a wave of more than a dozen cidermakers in the state. Davis is happy to see the growth. "If you're going to take a cider vacation," he says, "we want people to think of Vermont." Shacksbury's sales have doubled annually for the past three years, and its ciders are now distributed in about 20 states, including Texas and California. Though its tasting rooms serve several purposes, Davis explains that a major goal is to help visitors understand what traditional hard cider is — and can be. In addition to offering special or limited releases, the tasting facilities allow Shacksbury to share its philosophy firsthand. "We do things a little bit differently," Davis says. "It's not…

    5. Ground Crew: Vermont TSA Director Bruce McDonald on Keeping Civilians Safe

      On September 11, 2001, Bruce McDonald was at Pentagon City, about to get laid off by the United States Postal Service. Things turned out differently when an airplane flew into the Pentagon building across the street.

      → Version française On September 11, 2001, Bruce McDonald was at Pentagon City, about to get laid off by the United States Postal Service. Things turned out differently when an airplane flew into the Pentagon building across the street. Instead of being dismissed, "I went over and helped out with casualties," McDonald said. "I helped out wherever I could ... It was very obvious that we had been attacked." McDonald, now 57, is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force whose career involved setting up remote airfields. He has a master's degree in aviation management; his thesis, written in 1992, focused on terrorism in aviation. The day after 9/11, McDonald was mobilized by the Air Force Reserve to be the air stage manager out of Delaware's Dover Air Force Base. His role involved prepping C-5 aircrews for missions to the Middle East. In 2002, McDonald started to work for the Transportation Security Administration, where he continued his career of trying to keep civilians safe; he became its federal security director for Vermont in May 2005. The job is interesting to McDonald in part, he said, because no two days are alike. "As security director, my job is to partner and match up the capabilities of TSA with local police, other federal authorities, and airport and airline personnel," McDonald explained. His agency also works with highly trained bomb-smelling dogs; the canines and their handlers are a team in this effort. McDonald briefed BTV on his wide-ranging responsibilities. For people flying out of Burlington, how long before their plane is scheduled to depart do you recommend they arrive at the airport? Nationwide, TSA is currently experiencing the busiest travel periods on record. Nationally, TSA screened ... 28.3 million passengers and crew between June 28 and July 9. These high volumes are expected to [continue]. Passengers are encouraged to arrive two hours prior to their flight's scheduled departure. What is the average time per passenger for passing through security — from getting in line to clearance? On average, when processing through TSA PreCheck lanes at BTV, passengers wait less than five minutes in line. In standard lanes, passengers wait approximately 10 minutes in line. Peak travel time at BTV typically occurs in the early morning hours. Multiple flights depart [within] minutes of each other. What tools or metrics have you found are most useful for assessing the effectiveness of airport security? How…

    6. BTV — Fall 2018

      We're delighted to have you! BTV: The Burlington International Airport Quarterly is a bilingual magazine — translated into French for our Québécois visitors — that highlights Vermont's recreational and cultural scenes according to the season.

      → Version française We're delighted to have you! BTV: The Burlington International Airport Quarterly is a bilingual magazine — translated into French for our Québécois visitors — that highlights Vermont's recreational and cultural scenes according to the season. Autumn in Vermont means apples, and Shacksbury is returning to the roots of America's cider traditions. The Vergennes company ferments artisan beverages from the fruit of heritage cider varieties that have largely disappeared from commercial orchards, as well as from carefully selected wild apple trees discovered on back roads and overgrown homesteads. In this issue, find out more about Shacksbury's Lost Apple Project, a delicious development in the state's agricultural history. Speaking of trees, leaf-peeping season is upon us! We'll guide you to some of the best vistas for vibrant foliage, from high-altitude mountaintops to wide-open waterways. Regarding the latter, fall is a lovely time to hop aboard Burlington's Spirit of Ethan Allen and set sail on Lake Champlain. The cruise ship company marks its 35th season this year, and we look back on its waterfront legacy. Autumn also marks the start of Burlington's world-class performing arts season. We raise the curtain on the fall's most spectacular acts, as well as other showstopping area events — think arts festivals and harvest parties. Read on for our varied itinerary of what to do, see and sample. If you're just passing through Vermont, we hope you'll be convinced to return for a longer stay. Use this magazine, too, as a guide to the airport and on-the-ground transportation options. While you're waiting for takeoff, the Burlington International Airport aims to make your stay a pleasant one. Please have a look around and enjoy its amenities and services, including a yoga space, breastfeeding rooms, charging stations, free Wi-Fi and local art. Locavore crêperie the Skinny Pancake has café locations before and after security to keep you happily fed whether you're coming or going. We thank you for flying BTV and hope you'll come back to see us soon. Let the beautiful city of Burlington and state of Vermont amaze you. Nous sommes ravis de vous accueillir! BTV : Le bulletin trimestriel de l'Aéroport international de Burlington est un magazine bilingue, traduit en français pour nos amis québécois, qui met en valeur les attraits récréatifs, culturels et culinaires du Vermont, selon la saison. L'automne au Vermont, c'est la saison des pommes, et Shacksbury revient aux racines…

    7. Splash Into the History of Lake Champlain Aboard the Spirit of Ethan Allen III

      There's no better way to take in the spectacular beauty of Burlington, the Green Mountains and the Adirondacks than from Lake Champlain. And, short of owning your own sailboat, yacht or fishing vessel, taking a cruise aboard the Spirit of Ethan Allen III is one of the quickest and easiest ways to get out on the lake.

      → Version française There's no better way to take in the spectacular beauty of Burlington, the Green Mountains and the Adirondacks than from Lake Champlain. And, short of owning your own sailboat, yacht or fishing vessel, taking a cruise aboard the Spirit of Ethan Allen III is one of the quickest and easiest ways to get out on the lake. From April 15 through October, the boat runs daily sightseeing tours, lunch cruises and other special events — murder mystery tours, lobster dinners, Champagne brunches and harvest dinners — that depart from the Burlington Boathouse. Nearly 100,000 visitors step aboard to enjoy the area's natural splendor, learn a little local history and feel the wind in their hair. The Spirit of Ethan Allen company, now celebrating its 35th season, has a unique history of its own. Mike Shea, who previously had worked as an airline pilot and managed the Morrisville-Stowe State Airport, founded the cruise boat business in 1984. At the time, his parents owned and operated a paddle wheeler called the River Queen on the Fox River in Green Bay, Wis. When the Vermont airline Shea was working for went bankrupt, he followed in his parents' footsteps and pursued the maritime life. He first purchased the Dixie, a 149-passenger paddle wheeler from Philadelphia, and renamed it the Spirit of Ethan Allen in honor of the American Revolutionary War hero and Vermont founder. Its maiden voyage took place on May 28, 1984, at Burlington's Perkins Pier. Then-mayor Bernie Sanders — who, as U.S. senator, rose to national prominence during his 2016 presidential campaign — christened the vessel. He called its launch "the beginning of the new Burlington waterfront." "At the time, I had no idea what he was talking about," Shea admits. "But look at it now." Indeed, in those years Burlington's shoreline was still transitioning from its rusting industrial past into the booming tourist attraction it is today. The Spirit was instrumental in luring visitors to the lake and, in the process, fueled the growth of nearby restaurants, bars and hotels. In 1993, Shea relocated his ship to the Burlington Boathouse, where it's been berthed year-round ever since. In 1995, Shea acquired the 500-passenger Spirit of Ethan Allen II, which he operated until 2001 before moving it across the lake to Plattsburgh, N.Y., and renaming it the Spirit of Plattsburgh. The boat operated there until 2005, when…

    8. Raising the Curtain on Burlington's Performing Arts Scene

      From music to comedy and large-scale theater productions to offbeat original plays, the entertainment available in Burlington is vast and varied for a city of its size. Several downtown performing arts venues and organizations launch their seasons in September, making this the perfect time of year to catch a show. Read on for a sampling of the fall lineups for five of the city's major presenters.

      → Version française From music to comedy and large-scale theater productions to offbeat original plays, the entertainment available in Burlington is vast and varied for a city of its size. Several downtown performing arts venues and organizations launch their seasons in September, making this the perfect time of year to catch a show. Read on for a sampling of the fall lineups for five of the city's major presenters. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts 153 Main St., flynncenter.org Spectrum Dance Theater: The Seattle-based company presents movement with meaning in A Rap on Race, a dance piece inspired by a 1970 conversation between writer James Baldwin and anthropologist Margaret Mead. Saturday, October 6, 8 p.m. $25-45. David Bowie's Blackstar: Cellist Maya Beiser plays alongside the Ambient Orchestra as the voice of late rock star David Bowie in a sweeping reinterpretation of his final album, arranged and conducted by composer Evan Ziporyn. Saturday, October 13, 8 p.m. $35-58. Elf: What better way to get into the Christmas spirit than with this contemporary musical based on the 2003 film starring Will Ferrell? High-spirited songs propel the story of a Santa's helper searching for his human father in New York City. Wednesday, November 14, and Thursday, November 15, 7:30 p.m. $50-75. Vermont International Film Festival Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake St., vtiff.org Vermont International Film Festival: Cinephiles screen a showcase of local, independent and international motion pictures accompanied by filmmaker Q&As, receptions and discussions. Last year's celluloid celebration featured everything from fiction to documentary to short films. Friday, October 19, through Sunday, October 28. $60-200 for festival passes; $75 for a 10-film pack. VTIFF Monthly Screenings: Local movie buffs have a standing date to catch fresh flicks on the last Thursday of each month. The films may hail from a country halfway around the globe or from right here in the United States, but they always send a message that hits home. Every month on the last Thursday, 7 p.m. $5-8. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts 294 N. Winooski Ave., Suite 116C, offcentervt.com Burlington Fringe Festival: Twenty-four shows over four days spotlight some of the state's most inventive theater artists. Thursday is Blue Night, so risqué humor is fair game — but KidsFringe offers all-ages entertainment on Sunday. Thursday, October 11, through Saturday, October 13, 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, October 14, 4 p.m. $8-15. Vermont Comedy…

    9. Must-Do Autumn Activities: Hikes, Harvest Fests and Art Hop

      Love art? Hop on over to Burlington's Pine Street in early September. The artists' studios, galleries and post-industrial business spaces lining the colorful corridor reinvent themselves as exhibition sites during the city's 26th annual South End Art Hop, a three-day flurry of art activity and appreciation. More than 600 participating artists showcase their creative talents in exhibits, outdoor sculpture, live demonstrations and fashion shows — and as many as 30,000 visitors from the Northeast and Canada come to enjoy the view. Workshops, artist markets and the hands-on Kids Hop make the fest so much more than a spectator sport.

      → Version française South End Art Hop Love art? Hop on over to Burlington's Pine Street in early September. The artists' studios, galleries and post-industrial business spaces lining the colorful corridor reinvent themselves as exhibition sites during the city's 26th annual South End Art Hop, a three-day flurry of art activity and appreciation. More than 600 participating artists showcase their creative talents in exhibits, outdoor sculpture, live demonstrations and fashion shows — and as many as 30,000 visitors from the Northeast and Canada come to enjoy the view. Workshops, artist markets and the hands-on Kids Hop make the fest so much more than a spectator sport. Friday through Sunday, September 7 through 9, at various South End locations in Burlington. Info, seaba.com. Foliage HIkes It's no coincidence that to experience peak foliage in Vermont, you have to head to actual mountain peaks. While fiery leaves can be stunning from any standpoint, only from a high vantage do they paint the landscape as far as the eye can see. Looking for a striking view? Thirty-five minutes from Burlington, Mount Philo stands 968 feet tall, requiring relatively little effort for its wide-open overview of the Champlain Valley. The twisty mountain drive to Sterling Pond's trailhead, an hour away, is already lush with foliage, making the short trek to this alpine lake a popular destination. For a greater challenge — and greater rewards, too — try Camel's Hump, about 45 minutes from Burlington. Multiple trails lead to the top of the state's third-highest mountain. Find out more about these hikes at vtstateparks.com. Shelburne Farms Harvest Festival Around the world, a successful harvest season is a time for celebration. Not only does the bounty of freshly grown food call for a feast, it's an opportunity for hardworking farmers to kick up their heels and enjoy the fruits (and vegetables) of their labor. Many Vermont communities come together for harvest festivals, but nearby Shelburne hosts one of the largest and oldest. Shelburne Farms — a working farm, National Historic Landmark and nonprofit organization helping to build a sustainable future for the planet — welcomes farmers, food producers, entertainers, traditional crafters and the public to its 40th annual fest. Eat and be merry. Saturday, September 15, at Shelburne Farms. Info, shelburnefarms.org. South End Art Hop Vous aimez l'art? Faites un saut sur Pine Street, à Burlington, au début de septembre. Les studios d'artistes, galeries et espaces…

    10. The Cannabis Catch-Up: Will Weed Tourism Take Off in Vermont?
      Take note, Vermonters: Cannabis tourism is taking off in states that have legalized the drug. Forbes this week examined some of the ways Colorado, California and Nevada entrepreneurs are working to attract cannabis-consuming travelers. A group got together south of San Francisco in May for a Ganja Goddess Getaway, replete “with yoga, educational classes, spa treatments — and unlimited cannabis in every form imaginable, including smoothies, body creams and vapes,” Nick Kovacevich writes. The state also boasts “wine and weed” tours and “puff and paint” events. And in Las Vegas, where weed is banned from the Strip, a cannabis theme park will open in November. “Cannabis attracts everyone, from lawyers to truckers,” said Deidra Bagdasarian, the cofounder of the Ganja Goddess event. So will the green flow into the Green Mountain State? Probably not just yet. All those other places have one thing in common: a legalized cannabis marketplace. That is, you can legally buy weed. Vermont’s legalization is more of a half-measure. You can possess, grow and consume cannabis, but you can’t sell or buy it. Here are some other cannabis stories we followed this week (or so): August 9: Captive insurance companies based in Vermont won’t write policies for cannabis-related businesses because of marijuana's status as a Schedule 1 drug, according to David Provost, the Department of Finance’s deputy commissioner of the captive insurance division. [Gloria Gonzalez, Business Insurance] August 9: Is legal weed in Vermont changing things for local medical marijuana dispensaries? Not so far, apparently. [Ike Bendavid, WCAX] August 14: Could extracting THC and CBD from cannabis be as simple as making a cup of joe? Maybe! Scientists in Spain used an inexpensive espresso machine to perform quick, easy extractions. [Kyle Jaeger, Marijuana Moment] August 15: Across the country, budtenders and edibles chefs are among the top jobs created by the cannabis boom. Ohio is seeing a wave of new job listings for its 56 licensed medical marijuana dispensaries. [Randy Tucker, Cincinnati Enquirer] August 16: There was a primary election on Tuesday! What are winning candidates' stances on weed? Glad you asked. [John Young, Heady Vermont] August 16: This one’s long, but worthwhile. "Higher Office: How Republicans Learned to Love Marijuana." [Alexandra Hutzler, Newsweek] August 16: Sterling College recently held a weeklong hemp and CBD course called “Healing Hemp: Cannabidiol From Field to Product.” About 10 students took part. [Rob Williams, Heady Vermont] August 16:…

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